My deal, no deal or no Brexit: May after winning ministers' backing

Ann Santiago
November 16, 2018

British Prime Minister Theresa May battled for her political survival on Thursday as ministers resigned and members of her own party plotted to oust her over a draft Brexit deal struck with Brussels this week.

He added that "if I weren't confident that you did your best to protect the interest of the 27, and I familiar of the essence of the document, I would not propose to formalise this deal" at the summit later this month.

With her party in revolt, her colleagues departing - some determined to usher her out of office - we can't, and don't know yet, if Brexit can happen as planned, perhaps, if at all. "We can choose to leave with no deal, we can risk no Brexit at all, or we can choose to unite and support the best deal that can be negotiated".

Mrs May tried to defend her draft Brexit deal before a hostile parliament after two cabinet ministers including Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab, and two junior ministers quit the government.

If 48 such letters are submitted to Graham Brady, chair of the 1922, receives 48 such letters a formal vote of confidence in the Prime Minister is triggered amongst Tory MPs. He handed in a letter to the party's parliamentary committee in the House of Commons.

Under Conservative rules, a confidence vote in the leader is triggered if 15 per cent of Conservative lawmakers - now 48 - write a letter to the party's 1922 Committee of backbenchers, which oversees leadership votes.

"I can not reconcile the terms of the proposed deal with the promises we made".

"Today, I have resigned as Brexit Secretary".

Esther McVey announced she was resigning as Work and Pensions Secretary as she could not defend a deal which meant the United Kingdom "handing over control to the EU".

Little more than one in 10 (12%) believed that the United Kingdom was going to get a good deal with the EU.

"Delivering Brexit involves hard choices for all of us", said the Prime Minister.

It is not yet clear when parliament might vote on a deal.

May spoke in the UKJ parliament seeking the support for the freshly designed Brexit agreement while European Union summit is planned for November 25.


Ms McVey, who was promoted to the Cabinet by Mrs May in January, was reported to have been close to tears as she tried to force a vote on the Brexit deal in Wednesday's Cabinet.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock told the BBC's Radio 4 that lawmakers should back the draft divorce agreement because the alternatives were "ugly".

When Norway is mentioned in the context of Brexit, it is usually a reference to the relationship between Oslo and the European Union, which some Tories hope could be the basis for our future.

Supporters of Brexit admit there may be some short-term pain for Britain's $2.9 trillion economy, but say that, in the long term, it will prosper when cut free from the EU - which they cast as a failing German-dominated experiment in European integration.

At the end of another dramatic day, the Prime Minister is standing by her Brexit plan.

Main opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn said May should withdraw the "half-baked" Brexit deal and that Parliament "cannot and will not accept a false choice between this deal and no deal".

The Democratic Unionist Party, which props up May's minority government, also signalled that it would not vote for the deal.

The organisation's chairman David Dingle said truck drivers could be stuck on roads to Dover for up to two days if there was no deal.

Raab said there would be a devastating impact on public trust in the government unless it changed course on Brexit.

"What I can tell you is there's no orchestrated attempt to put letters in", Burns said. But officials in Brussels admitted the plan could go awry depending on events in London.

The deal requires the consent of the European Parliament as well as the British one.

Labour will press Theresa May to spell out how she is going to avoid a high-risk no-deal Brexit, arguing that the hostility from MPs since her final deal was unveiled demonstrates that she can not get her plans through the Commons.

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