Brexit fraying UK-Irish relations, Varadkar warns

Muriel Hammond
November 8, 2018

Asked how they would vote if the government secured a deal and it was put to the people, 33 per cent said they would reject it, 26 per cent accept it, 34 per cent did not know, and 7 per cent indicated they would not vote.

Varadkar was speaking just hours after the British and Irish governments signalled that there could be a breakthrough on the Irish border impasse within weeks, which would pave the way to a Brexit deal between the United Kingdom and the EU.

The backstop ensures that Northern Ireland would stay "aligned" to the regulations of the single market and the customs union if there is still no other solution that would avoid infrastructure along the Irish border.

The statement said that senior European Union figures like Donald Tusk, Jean-Claude Juncker and chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier "and indeed Theresa May herself" have all said there will not be a deal "without a legal guarantee of no hard Border in Ireland".

According to the Telegraph, May has included Attorney General Geoffrey Cox, the government's chief legal advisor, in her special Brexit Cabinet after ministers said they wouldn't sign off on a deal without his advice.

Another government figure speculated that Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab could resign over the issue of the Irish backstop.

"The Prime Minister said that there would need to be a mechanism through which the backstop could be brought to an end", a spokesperson added.


BREXIT is already providing a stimulus to the economy of United Kingdom with more individuals deciding to purchase British goods and go for purported "staycation" holidays, as per a new report.

Downing Street claimed the report about the deal is "all speculation".

According to the Sunday Times, the agreement would include an "exit clause" aimed at convincing Brexiteers that remaining in the customs union would be temporary.

Northern Isles MP Alistair Carmichael said that the results were "no surprise" and that the door is still open for another referendum owing to the political mess in Westminster.

A spokesperson said: "The prime minister has been clear that we are making good progress on the future relationship and 95pc of the Withdrawal Agreement is now settled and negotiations are ongoing".

"I'm trying not to be negative because it is so easy for people like us to sit in a tv studio talking about how people could do it better and differently".

"He recalled the prior commitments made that the backstop must apply "unless and until" alternative arrangements are agreed".

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