Heads up: Theresa May to address Tory lawmakers in parliament later today

Saul Bowman
October 24, 2018

May's most recent attempt to break the deadlock - her suggestion that the United Kingdom could extend the transition period "for a few months" if the United Kingdom needed more time to solve the Irish border conundrum - was met with fury by Tory MPs, who accused May of unnecessarily delaying Brexit while preparing to hand over more money to the EU.

Protocols have been developed on how Brexit would affect Gibraltar and the UK's military base in Cyprus.

Sir Christopher Chope said that the current situation was "licensed anarchy" and questioned why it was allowed to happen and suggested that it was a "double-standard" to say that post-Brexit there would be additional border issues given the ones at the moment.

Two Brexit supporting Conservative MPs have scolded Northern Ireland businesses for not doing enough contingency planning for a no-deal.

British Prime Minister Theresa May is set to tell parliament that 95 per cent of Britain's divorce deal from the European Union has now been settled. Many of them were angry last week after she floated the idea of keeping the United Kingdom bound to European Union trade terms for longer than previously planned.

Urging Tory MPs to hold their nerve during the toughest part of the negotiations, she rejected calls for another referendum and said reports that civil servants were planning for such an eventuality were untrue.

One told The Sunday Times that the prime minister had entered "the killing zone" this week, while another told The Mail on Sunday that she should "bring her own noose" if she went to the 1922 Committee meeting.

'We would not accept a position in which the United Kingdom, having negotiated in good faith an agreement which prevents a hard border in Northern Ireland, nonetheless finds itself indefinitely locked into an alternative, inferior arrangement against our will'.


"In a no-deal scenario we will be publishing very shortly a healthcare reciprocal arrangements bill and we are undertaking bilateral discussion with the main countries in which United Kingdom citizens reside, and from whom their citizens live in the United Kingdom, in order to get to a position where people's health is looked after wherever they live".

Conservative lawmaker Grant Shapps said the coming week would be unsafe for May, as pro-Brexit Tories pondered whether to try to oust her.

Restating her opposition to a "people's vote" on the ultimate Brexit deal, Karen Bradley, who voted Remain in 2016, insisted it would undermine the democratic process.

Even if half that number voted down the deal, that would still create a strong possibility of it failing to pass, creating uncertain conditions in which a number of now seemingly far-fetched scenarios would become more plausible.

He told them that, though they had been promised a "meaningful" vote on the eventual Brexit deal made with Brussels, the vote would be a take-it-or-leave-it option.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the Government had been forced to consider extending the transition period as a result of "its own incompetence". "I see any extension, any extension or being in any form of backstop as undesirable".

Mr Billington said that more police and security on the border may reduce the fraud but that you then look at "going back to the bad old times" and that former paramilitaries would "play" on the division that would create. The Committee has received 46 letters of no confidence in Theresa May, with the threshold for calling a full no confidence vote standing at 48.

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