Navjot Singh Sidhu in Pakistan for Imran Khan’s swearing-in ceremony

Saul Bowman
August 18, 2018

Mr Khan, 65, saw his party sweep to victory in a July 25 general election promising to fight corruption and lift millions of people out of poverty.

The PTI chairman will be sworn in as Prime Minister on Saturday by President Mamnoon Hussain. The Senate, parliament's upper chamber, is controlled by the opposition. Imran Khan has this privilege due to a fallout among opposition parties.

Addressing the house amid a ruckus by PML-N members and cheering by PTI legislators, a charged Khan said: "I promise my nation today that we will bring the tabdeeli (change) that this nation was starving for".

After the election, three major opposition parties banded together to nominate Shahbaz Sharif as a joint candidate in a bid to thwart Khan. "You had said that if rigging in 2013 elections would be proven, Nawaz Sharif's government should resign".

Former Indian cricketer-turned-politician Navjot Singh Sidhu arrived in Pakistan on Friday to attend the oath-taking ceremony of Prime Minister-in-waiting Imran Khan.

"I did not climb on any dictator's shoulders; I reached this place after struggling for 22 years".


The result announcement by the speaker of the house rattled lawmakers of PML-N sparking a loud protest against Khan's victory as unacceptable repeatedly chanting "Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif" who was judicially ousted from the premiership past year and is serving time in prison on corruption charges.

"The money that was laundered, I will bring it back - the money that should have gone towards health, education, and water, went into people's pockets", said Khan, moving on to allegations of vote rigging.

Sharif, who was jailed over corruption accusations weeks before the election, saw his second stint in power ended by a military coup in 1999.

The economy is likely to preoccupy Khan's first few months in office, with his administration facing a battle to reduce a ballooning current account gap and a high fiscal deficit, which shot up to 6.8 percent of GDP in the 12 months to end of June.

Will a new dawn for Pakistan mean a shift in relations with India?

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