Sadr calls for broad coalition following Iraq election 'win'

Saul Bowman
May 16, 2018

Tallies put the anti-establishment Conquest Alliance of pro-Iranian former paramilitary fighters who helped battle IS in second, and incumbent Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi´s bloc back in third.

The preliminary results were based on a count of more than 91 percent of the votes cast in 16 of Iraq's 18 provinces.

Al-Abadi said at the least, a manual recount should be held in the northern province of Kirkuk after accusations of fraud and faulty machines were made there.

An official on the US State Division remained coy forward of the definitive tally, telling AFP "we're awaiting the announcement of the official outcomes and stay up for the formation of the brand new authorities".

The Sadr-led army has also been blamed for "the killing of thousands of Sunni Muslims in the sectarian violence that plagued Iraq in 2006 and 2007", says the BBC.

As Kurdistan 24 points out, al-Sadr has "far fewer ties to Tehran than Soleimani's clear preferred victor, Al-Fatih Coalition leader Hadi al-Amiri", which is likely the reason for Soleimani's visit-to form Iraq's next government.


"We stand ready to work with whoever is fairly elected by the Iraqi people". Mr. Sadr, who once called for attacks on American forces, capitalized on this widespread discontent by rebranding himself in recent years as a champion of the poor, a firebrand against corruption and a patriot who rails against outside interference by Iran as well as America. But Sadr will not become prime minister because he did not run in the election.

But even then, his bloc might not necessarily form the next government.

Iraqi firebrand political figure Muqtada al-Sadr is set to be announced the surprise victor of the country's elections and prepared for his new status as government titan by making a call for national unity.

The poll noticed a report low turnout, as exclusively 44.5 % of eligible voters headed to the polls within the lowest participation fee because the 2003 US-led ouster of Saddam Hussein. It included full returns from only 10 of the country's 19 provinces, including the provinces of Baghdad and Basra.

The result of the election was a ruthless setback.

He announced Tuesday on state television that it was the responsibility of Iraq's Independent High Electoral Commission (IHEC) to conduct the recount to determine accurate results, citing high-profile charges of vote tampering in the disputed province of Kirkuk.

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