Whistleblower: Flynn texts broached nuclear plan, sanctions

Saul Bowman
December 8, 2017

Donald Trump was just 11 minutes into his presidency when his choice for national security adviser, Michael Flynn, texted a former business partner to say an ambitious US collaboration with Russian Federation to build nuclear reactors in the Middle East was "good to go", according to a new whistleblower account.

Cummings did not identify the witness, whom he described as a whistleblower.

"Your letter seems to resort to desperate and baseless jurisdictional excuses to avoid conducting oversight in an apparent attempt to protect President Trump and his Administration", Cummings said while pointing out "inaccuracies" in Gowdy' letter.

Flynn also informed the associate that his business partners could move forward with their project, which aimed to construct a network of nuclear reactors across the Mideast with support from Russian and other worldwide interests, the whistleblower said.

In Flynn's agreement last week to plead guilty to one count of making false statements, prosecutors said that Flynn lied to Federal Bureau of Investigation agents about his discussions on sanctions against Russia with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak during the presidential transition. Congress later passed a bipartisan measure that placed new sanctions on Russian Federation, a bill that Trump reluctantly signed in August.

"I do not bring this whistleblower to your attention lightly", Cummings, the Baltimore lawmaker and top Democrat on the committee wrote in the letter.

President Trump's personal White House lawyer, Ty Cobb, also declined to comment.

According to Cummings's letter, the witness said he met Alex Copson, Flynn's former business associate, at an inaugural event.

The witness did not specify which sanctions Flynn was referring to in his texts.


"Mike has been putting everything in place for us", Copson told the whistleblower.

As the president spoke, Flynn reportedly texted Copson that the nuclear project was "good to go", the witness said Copson told him.

Cummings responded to Gowdy's letter with a letter Thursday that called Gowdy's refusal to investigate the whistleblower's claims "astonishing". The witness could not read the text, but he saw that the time stamp was 12:11 p.m., according Cummings's letter. The whistleblower also said that Copson intimated that US financial sanctions hobbling the nuclear project were going to be "ripped up".

Neither Copson nor an attorney for ACU responded to a request for comment.

The congressman wrote that the whistleblower was "extremely uncomfortable" with the conversation and left shortly thereafter.

Perhaps most intriguingly of all, Cummingswrites that he told Special Counsel Robert Mueller's team about all this some time ago - and that they asked him to delay publicly revealing this information "until they completed certain investigation steps".

ACU Strategic Partners paid for Flynn to travel to Israel and Egypt in 2015 to promote the nuclear project, paying him a fee of $25,000, according to a letter Copson sent the committee.

In various filings in 2016 and 2017, Flynn did not initially disclose his connection to ACU and foreign contacts he made while advising the firm.

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