International Space Station photobombs solar eclipse

Muriel Hammond
August 23, 2017

The International Space Station was captured flying across the solar eclipse. Nope! Now that the celestial event has wrapped up we get to gawk at all the awesome photos taken from all over North America, and even some particularly fantastic shots from the International Space Station.

Kutryk believes people are living at a time when humans will potentially return to the moon and that he hopes to travel there.

The ISS, with six crew members on board, was transiting the Sun at roughly five miles a second during the eclipse.

The total solar eclipse Monday was the first time one has occurred and was visible from the U.S.in more than 30 years. The astronauts will be able to see the moon cover no more than 86% of the sun in any of those passes.


A total solar eclipse is seen on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon.

Onboard as part of Expedition 52 are: NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson, Jack Fischer, and Randy Bresnik; Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy; and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Paolo Nespoli.

Just as millions of people across the world tuned in to catch a glimpse of the sky fall dark, a NASA photographer Joel Kowsky, who was watching from Wyoming, USA, captured the ISS photobombing the sun.

A total solar eclipse is seen on Monday, August 21, 2017 from onboard a NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center's Gulfstream III 25,000 feet above the OR coast.

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