How to repurpose your solar eclipse glasses and do some good

Muriel Hammond
August 23, 2017

And if you were thinking of hanging on to them until the next solar eclipse in the U.S.in 2024, think again.

Astronomers Without Borders urges people to hold on to their glasses so they can be reused in other countries for future eclipses. According to the Astronomers Without Borders website, they are working with their partners and sponsors to announce a plan for collecting the eclipse glasses, which will be announced shortly.

People in parts of Chile and Argentina will see the totality, but much of South America will be able to witness a partial solar eclipse.

The Beaufort County Emergency Management office has chose to collect solar eclipse glasses as part of the effort.

A similar effort helped AWB send nearly 14,000 pairs of glasses to schools in Africa when an eclipse took place there in 2013.


In 2013, the organization hosted a similar drop-off program for west and central African schools for that year's solar eclipse, Smithsonian reported.

If holding onto your frames for almost seven years doesn't sound desirable, (and let's face it, they're not that expensive, ) you could also pop out the lenses and toss them in the recycling bin.

If you've heard rumors that the solar filters on eclipse glasses expire after three years, ignore them. It's a wonderful educational opportunity for a number of communities who might not have access to the glasses they need to safely view the eclipse, and Americans now have truckloads of eclipse glasses they don't need anymore.

Lenses could be re-purposed to a local camera store that processes film, according to the Space Science Institute. Take the lenses out first and just throw them away.

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